WOMENS TRAINING PROGRAM IN AFGHANISTAN

 

INTRODUCTION

 

This outline is designed to help and guide women to achieve a sense of empowerment.  It will prepare trainers to offer evidence-based data to educate the women to recognize the basis of their feelings, thinking and acting.  To achieve this objective the following schema of training systematically has been identified and documented offering trainers a “map”.  This training will have to be adapted to the cultural, ethnic, religious and traditional modes and rules of the students’ society.

MODULE

 

Module 1:

Orientation to the course:

 

WHY HAVE THIS MODULE

 

Purpose:

 

CONTENT

 

·        Training skills to train part-time workers

·        A "trainer" must combine being a manager and a teacher

·        Purpose of lectures

·        Effective training methods

 

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

 

Objectives for Trainers

 

At the end of this course trainers should be able to:

 

 

Specific

 

At the end of the course, the participant trainers should be able to:

 

 

The course consists of the three subject areas distributed throughout six modules. The subject areas are:

 

 

Each subject has a content presentation and a discussion. When appropriate, group work and individual exercises, will be assigned.

 

CONTENT

 

GUIDELINES TO TRAIN TRAINERS

 

 

Guidelines for Educator (Expert that trains the trainers)

 

Reception by Trainers From the Educator — Their questions and thinking

 

 

 

WOMEN BEING TAUGHT—Recipients of the course-content

 

 

 

 

 

EDUCATOR GUIDELINES TO ASSIST TRAINERS TO DEVELOP CONTENT

 

It is helpful to make explicit descriptions of how one goes about the business of organizing a lecture, a course, or a seminar.

 

Describe and document how a trainer teaches and explains actions-planning and delivery of lectures for women. Also guide trainers to choose activities, answer questions, write vignettes,

 

            How do you organize the course?

            How do you select the objectives? Ask student's needs before you select content.

            How do you select content or focus on knowledge necessary to improve knowledge, skills, change behavior and beliefs?

            How do you start? What should be the introduction?

            How do you proceed?

            How do you process interaction with student?

            How do you finish the session?

 

In this course you need to attend to two levels.

 

 

When preparing a lesson, a number of issues should be considered including:

 

 

When preparing the lesson consider the following guidelines:

 

Introduction

 

Main points of the lesson

 

Conclusion

 

Materials

 

METHODS THAT PROMOTE SKILL DEVELOPMENT AND BEHAVIOR AND ATTITUDE CHANGE

 

Experiential Exercises—chosen to practice what they learned

 

A planned activity meant to provide an opportunity for participants to discover learned based on their own experiences.

 

Type—choose what is appropiate to their customs and tradition

 

Procedure

 

 

Feedback and Assessment Instruments

 

Measurement devices that provide feedback on behavior and attitudes

 

Examples:

 

 

METHODS USED TO TRANSMIT KNOWLEDGE, CHANGE ATTITUDES, AND PROMOTE SKILL DEVELOPMENT

 

 

Methods Used to Transmit Knowledge, Insight, Understanding

 

Readings

Mini-Lecture

 

Audiovisual Techniques (if available)

 

Methods Used to Change Attitudes and Values as Well as to Transmit Knowledge

 

Discussion

 

Variations

 

Trainers will be using material in which learning objectives and content have already been formulated by the curriculum. To understand fully and effectively how to implement these objectives on their own level, course participants should be able to construct learning objectives of their choice.

 

LEARNING AND COURSE OBJECTIVES chosen by the trainers based on guidelines of the curriculum     (lecture/discussion with the EDUCATOR)

 

What is meant by learning objective?

 

Objectives describe in the clearest terms possible what a student should think, act or feel at the end of a learning experience.1 Mager describes an objective as "an INTENT communicated by a statement describing a proposed change in a learner -- a statement of what the learner is to be when he has successfully completed a learning experience.2

 

Objectives are always written according to what students are able to do, not what the teacher intends to teach. For example, for the unit on the instruction on interactive technique, the learning objective should be "by the end of session the participant should be able to conduct a face-to-face assertive conversation."

 

The learning objective should not be "to teach participants how to interact".

 

If the objective focuses on teaching "participants" how to interact, the trainer may meet the objective without necessarily giving the participants the competence they need. On the other hand, if the objective is to enable the participants to conduct an interaction, the teacher will have to focus on the participants I behavior rather than simply on his or her own actions.

 

Why write objectives?

 

Learning objectives are written to:

 

Clearly, learning objectives help the trainer as much as they help the students. By constructing them and placing them in a sequence, trainers plan the learning experience and become familiar with the choreography of the learning process. Having objectives guide the presentations, trainers can assess whether participants have acquired the desired level of competence during the learning process. If deficiencies or missteps occur, trainers can modify or break objectives into smaller measures, which allow trainers to adapt the learning experience to the situation or the individual learner. Therefore, objectives reinforce learning, and increase flexibility while they avoid unnecessary duplication. It is the responsibility of the trainer to create a motivating environment and to assist the participants in achieving the learning objectives.

 

HOW TO WRITE OBJECTIVES

 

Who is to perform the desired behavior?  Answer - the women/students

 

Objectives are written to participants. The participants attending a course in psychosocial behavior can be single or married women, or a mixed group. Whatever the composition, one must always consider the participants' prior knowledge, skills, and attitudes as a basis for writing appropriate objectives.

 

What are the components of an objective?

 

Mager (1962) proposed that an objective should contain at least three components: behavior, condition, standard:    Behavior is a specific, observable act (e.g., to write, to explain).

 

The behavior should be clear, specific, and non-ambiguous so that it can be analyzed.

Behavior should be described using action verbs that are clear, specific, and unambiguous. Standards will be covered during actual operations-observing the women’s behavior-speech

 

I Davies LK. 1976. Objectives in curriculum design. McGra.wHilI, New York, NY

2 Mager R.F. 1962. Preparing instructional objectives. Fearon Publishers, Palo Alto, CA

3 Mager R.F. 1962. Preparing instructional objectives. Fearon Publishers, Palo Alto, CA

 

TEACHING RESOURCES

 

PREPARING THE COURSE: RELATIONSHIP OF VARIOUS STEPS.

 

*SELECTION, ORGANIZATION OF COURSE

*OBJECTIVES OF EACH Component

 * METHODOLOGY

PRESENTATION

 

  *WORK PLAN TO IMPLEMENT COURSE

 

  *PLAN FOR PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AND UTILIZATION OF RESULTS